Eliminating Duplicate Content and Using Cross-Pollination
by TRIBUS Marketing
on Jun 23, 2014
Listed in Content

duplicate content badIt’s no secret that content plays a huge role in a website’s ranking on Google, but that doesn’t mean any content is going to give you that necessary boost to be seen as superior in the critical eyes of Google. Just as the AP Style is to the journalistic world, rules exist in the content marketing realm to ensure that readers are seeing robust, accurate and high-quality content.

So does that mean if I create well-researched content that I can copy and paste it into various channels?

Without getting too heavy into the technology side of things, copy and pasting the same content has very damaging effects on anyone’s website in terms of ranking. If search engines scan multiple pages to see the same exact copy, they aren’t sure which one is the original and which should rank higher. Google can then decide to flag your site, killing any search engine optimization efforts you have made.

But if I wrote it, why does it matter?

Remember in school when your teachers talked about plagiarizing? Copying someone else’s work is a big no-no, but in the eyes of Google copying your own is just as unforgivable. When you’re selling homes, you likely have a similar pitch or speech to you give to potential leads. Each person, based on his or her price range, wants and needs, area, etc., will receive a slightly different pitch. The same works with written materials.

Learn About Our Custom Real Estate Brokerage Software

If you’re copy and pasting the same content in various channels, like a press release, blog post, email marketing piece and social media campaign, you aren’t doing your audience any service. It’s perfectly acceptable to use the same topic for multiple written pieces, but give each of them a different angle or spin.

Remember that your audience is vast, diverse and reads news in a different manner. While some people prefer to read quick snippets of information in an email, others would rather get the whole picture by reading an entire 500-word blog post. You can’t treat these audiences in the same way.

Cross-pollination content

As previously stated, taking a topic and spinning it in several different directions is a great way to utilize the information you have in the most robust way. Your clients and potential clients think differently, know different things, have different education levels, etc.–it’s not a one-size fits all scenario!

Take one news topic, which for this example we’ll talk about a local real estate market update. Email marketing serves a crowd that is likely looking at the content via a smartphone, and may be on the run while doing so. For this piece, the sentences will be punchy, filled with factual information and to-the-point.

  • A blog post on a market update may go into an in-depth analysis of the market conditions, how they compare to statistics a year ago, a month ago and any projections for the upcoming year. The blog post will require a lot more research than the email marketing piece and will be much longer. Blog posts can also feature a little bit of flowery language like you’re painting a picture of the local conditions.
  • The press release will feature industry-expert quotes, factual information with some analysis and very straight-forward language.
  • Social media content is intended to be highly shareable. That may mean photos, graphs, videos and lists. Market conditions can be explained in a multimedia format that is much easier to digest than a lengthy blog post or press release.

At TRIBUS, we have a team of writers that specializes in creating unique content just for you and your site. If you have any questions regarding our services or the ideas above, feel free to comment below or contact us.


Request a Personalized Demo
First Name *
Last Name *
Phone *
How Large is Your Team? *
Company *
What Can We Assist You With? *