The Only 3 Things That Matter
by
on Jun 30, 2009
Listed in News

There Are Only Three Things That Matter On A Real Estate Website

– The original text behind this idea comes from a presentation I saw by Michael Simonsen at Altos Research

The truth is that there is only  three things that potential clients care about when visiting a real estate related website.

  1. What’s My Home Worth?
  2. How’s The Market?
  3. What Homes Are For Sale?

Really you only need to  answer one of these questions well to have a sticky brokerage site, but if you can answer more than one you start building a premier site.

Consider that people don’t care about your “featured listings,” they want to see all listings.  They don’t care about seeing pictures with you and your dog, they don’t stay on websites that only has a giant picture of your team above the fold (the line at which you can see the website without scrolling).  Get them where tehy want to go, listings and data.  For example with our St Louis affiliate, River City Real Estate, the primary item you see on their site is the map based real estate search.  People know exactly what they can do on the site and they know exactly how to do it.  This is the ultra simplicity you should consider including on your site.

Maybe you have market data you’d like to include on your site, again, make the site focused on that and answering people’s questions about the area.  Perhaps you could integrate Zillow’s API service to even answer the question of “What’s my home worth?”

Begin to offer these major items and you’ll create long term sticky users to your site.  The kinds of users that build long term sales pipelines.

With more than 17 years experience in the real estate industry, including being a Realtor and Broker / Owner, Stegemann brings a wealth of knowledge to this job as CEO of TRIBUS. He focuses his time on helping brokers enhance and expand their business and working with the TRIBUS labs team to consider what's next in real estate.
  • I hate to agree with all three points because I absolutely loathe creating monthly data reports and our MLS software doesn't make it particularly easy. What do you use to give sellers an idea of the value of their home on your site?

  • Our brokerage sites currently use a Zillow widget, but we're working with the API to create our own interface -BTW use Altos data for mrkt rpts :)

  • I hate to agree with all three points because I absolutely loathe creating monthly data reports and our MLS software doesn't make it particularly easy. What do you use to give sellers an idea of the value of their home on your site?

  • I hate to agree with all three points because I absolutely loathe creating monthly data reports and our MLS software doesn't make it particularly easy. What do you use to give sellers an idea of the value of their home on your site?

  • Our brokerage sites currently use a Zillow widget, but we're working with the API to create our own interface -BTW use Altos data for mrkt rpts :)

  • Our brokerage sites currently use a Zillow widget, but we're working with the API to create our own interface -BTW use Altos data for mrkt rpts :)

  • Pingback: Outside.in Hyperlocal Search | Tribus Real Estate - The Real Estate UnFranchise()

  • Just ran across this post. Eric you’re dead on with your three things that matter. Here’s the problem with Zillow – their accuracy sucks. If they were held accountable and were a realtor being hired in any market they would not get any business. Their stated (in)accuracy in our market in St Louis is north of 10% off on average. Most are worse than that.

    So, I can not see EVER putting the Zillow API on our website for telling a prospect what their home is worth. In fact, we use that very fact to sell against brokers (and agents) who do this. “Mr Seller, for example Broker A has so little expertise in pricing homes that they use Zillow – a 3rd party that says they are off by more than 10% on average. Now, you don’t want a realtor or brokerage who doesn’t understand value do you? Isn’t that a pretty important thing in hiring an expert.”

    I’d rather have them request value and respond or have to call for a request – let others send out garbage over the fence with silly Zillow values.

    On another note, we’re even seeing Zillow stuff from weak buyer agents coming in on listings. EVERY time the buyer has lost out to a better realtor who has educated the agent to why Zillow’s data is entertaining at best – but inaccurate always.

  • Eric Stegemann

    Kevin,
    First of all since that post, I added the “fourth thing” as I like to call it. Hyperlocal data. (I touch on it here: https://www.tribusgroup.com/outside-in-hyperlocal-search/ )

    I agree that in many cases the Zillow data is not the best. Even the Zillow employees admit to that. But Zillow has done something effecitve, they realized that in some cases, when a homeowner isn’t necessarily in the selling stage, they just want a quick idea of what their home is worth. They’ll be the first to tell you that when it’s time for a sale, the homeowner should contact a Realtor. We use Zillow data for area wide information where it becomes much more accurate on the aggregate. Our data from Altos is in most cases the best choice, but again they are an aggregate of an entire zip code.

    However, it goes back to the “I want it now” system. Zillow offers answers now, waiting for someone to send you back materials is in many cases too long of a wait.

    100% agree with you though that when a client is ready to engage in a more serious home pursuit, the agent they speak with should NOT be using Zillow or Altos data as their CMA preparation tool.

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